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17 Nov 2016 214 views
 
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photoblog image Oddities From Nature

Oddities From Nature

Here are two oddities from the garden.  They can not be blamed on chemicals of any kind. I have grown organically here for over three decades. The tomato ended up in a sauce and the apple in the compost after it shriveled.

 

 

 

 

 

photoblog image IMG_9989.JPG

 

 

I recommend this link about a British photographer's new book.

Oddities From Nature

Here are two oddities from the garden.  They can not be blamed on chemicals of any kind. I have grown organically here for over three decades. The tomato ended up in a sauce and the apple in the compost after it shriveled.

 

 

 

 

 

photoblog image IMG_9989.JPG

 

 

I recommend this link about a British photographer's new book.

comments (17)

That tomato is unique all on it's own. My daughter in law loves gardening and she is also strong on organically growing fruits and vegetable to herbs. I on the other hand have no green thumb. sad
Mary MacADNski: Good for you if your daughter in law shares. Thumbs don't have to be green because you can learn everything. It just required strong attendance and hard work.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 17 Nov 2016, 00:51
Cool!

Double bananas are quite common...but I caused a stir the other day when I discovered a treble.
Mary MacADNski: This type of protrusion is common in tomatoes too. I had several but shot only this one.
A Playboy Tomato! Plus mutant Apple, they sell odd shapes fruit/veg at reduced prices in a store I go to in the U.K. Why does the shape matter? Seems veggist/fruitist to me!
Mary MacADNski: I like that you can get odd shapes for less - no difference in nutrition.
  • Ladicola
  • United States
  • 17 Nov 2016, 03:47
Nature can be very interesting indeed.
Mary MacADNski: These protrusions on tomatoes are common and double and weird blossoms on any fruit is common.
  • Martine
  • France
  • 17 Nov 2016, 05:37
J'aime bien cette tomate et son nœud papillon.
Mary MacADNski: Ha ha. The other way it looks like a rabbit.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 17 Nov 2016, 06:08
Wonderful oddities - I like them.
Mary MacADNski: Both idiosyncrasies are quite common in fruit production.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 17 Nov 2016, 06:44
These are great aren't they. Not only that but the photography link is a real treat
Mary MacADNski: I really enjoyed the photography too. Others here had seen him or info.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 17 Nov 2016, 06:56
Hahahah!! ! I can imagine a cat;s head with the tomato or perhaps a bunny from the Playboy era. Many of our supermarkets will reject fruit and vegetables that are less than a perfect shape; they all taste the same!
Mary MacADNski: Turned around, the tomato definitely looks like a bunny. Frank said in England he could buy odd shapes for less.
That is a very funny Tom. Mary. The apple looks scary. Appropriate music,.
Mary MacADNski: Groan, I think.... about the music.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 Nov 2016, 09:24
The devil's tomatoes!
Mary MacADNski: Ha ha ha. They are quite common actually. I had them in all different varietirs. Perhaps it was the dryness where the plant is sending out suckers to look for water.
Indeed most unusual.
Mary MacADNski: This is not actually that unusual. I have put up an explanation on Saturday's blog.
That book and some of the pictures were featured in our press and television recently.
Mary MacADNski: Isn't it wonderful. I really liked it.
i would be inclined to think this kind of phenomenon would take place both with or without organic farming, Mary. but good photo opportunities.
Mary MacADNski: I have put the info on the tomatoes on Sat. blog.It is common too for blossoms to develop strangely and produce odd shaped fruit.
  • elleplate
  • United Kingdom
  • 17 Nov 2016, 14:02
Its nice to see that this can happen even when fruit and veg is grown organically - I have had odd specimens like these too, but I put it down to unfortuntely living too close to a nuclear power station!
Mary MacADNski: I researched it just now and put the explanation on tomorrow's (Sat)post.
Genetics at work!
Mary MacADNski: They are and this is more common with heirloom tomatoes which mine were one hundred percent.
The supermarkets would have a fit!

I have seen about this book. It was quite a project
Mary MacADNski: I have explained the tomatoes Saturday. Loved that book project.
Ain't nature crazy sometimes!!!
Loved the article, Mary. Thank you!
Mary MacADNski: I have nature's explanation tomorrow.

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camera Canon EOS REBEL T3
exposure mode aperture priority
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aperture f/4.5
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 33.0mm
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