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19 Nov 2016 158 views
 
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photoblog image Peek a Boo Purrl

Peek a Boo Purrl

 

 

photoblog image IMG_0191sat.JPG

 

I looked up information on the odd shaped tomato. Here is the simplest information. It will not let me copy and paste the words so the link will have to do.  The last item in the article is what you want to read. Their explanation is good for both the fact of our very hot summer and 100% of my tomatoes were heirloom.

 

Deformed Tomato Fruit Noses Have you ever seen a tomato with a “nose” on it? Such weird shaped tomatoes may have what looks like horns as well. What causes tomato noses? Well, it’s a physiological/genetic disorder that occurs in about 1 out of every 1,000 plants. Basically, the problem arises when the fruit is still microscopic. A few cells divide incorrectly and make an extra fruit locule. When you slice into a tomato, they have 4 or 6 obvious segments, which are called locules. As the tomato grows, the genetic mutation that occurred when it was microscopic grows with the fruit until eventually you see a mature tomato with a ‘nose’ or horns. The environment has to do with the genetic mutation. Extended temps of above 90 degrees F. (32 C.) and over 82-85 F. (27-29 C.) at night cause this deformity. It doesn’t necessarily affect the entire plant; in fact, usually only one or two fruits are affected. This also happens more often on older heirloom varieties. The good news is that it will quit happening when temps moderate and the resulting fruit is quite amusing as well as perfectly edible.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Tomato Fruit Problems – Reasons For Weird Shaped Tomatoes http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/weird-shaped-tomatoes.htm

 

 

Deformed Tomato Fruit Noses Have you ever seen a tomato with a “nose” on it? Such weird shaped tomatoes may have what looks like horns as well. What causes tomato noses? Well, it’s a physiological/genetic disorder that occurs in about 1 out of every 1,000 plants. Basically, the problem arises when the fruit is still microscopic. A few cells divide incorrectly and make an extra fruit locule. When you slice into a tomato, they have 4 or 6 obvious segments, which are called locules. As the tomato grows, the genetic mutation that occurred when it was microscopic grows with the fruit until eventually you see a mature tomato with a ‘nose’ or horns. The environment has to do with the genetic mutation. Extended temps of above 90 degrees F. (32 C.) and over 82-85 F. (27-29 C.) at night cause this deformity. It doesn’t necessarily affect the entire plant; in fact, usually only one or two fruits are affected. This also happens more often on older heirloom varieties. The good news is that it will quit happening when temps moderate and the resulting fruit is quite amusing as well as perfectly edible.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Tomato Fruit Problems – Reasons For Weird Shaped Tomatoes http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/weird-shaped-tomatoes.htm
Deformed Tomato Fruit Noses Have you ever seen a tomato with a “nose” on it? Such weird shaped tomatoes may have what looks like horns as well. What causes tomato noses? Well, it’s a physiological/genetic disorder that occurs in about 1 out of every 1,000 plants. Basically, the problem arises when the fruit is still microscopic. A few cells divide incorrectly and make an extra fruit locule. When you slice into a tomato, they have 4 or 6 obvious segments, which are called locules. As the tomato grows, the genetic mutation that occurred when it was microscopic grows with the fruit until eventually you see a mature tomato with a ‘nose’ or horns. The environment has to do with the genetic mutation. Extended temps of above 90 degrees F. (32 C.) and over 82-85 F. (27-29 C.) at night cause this deformity. It doesn’t necessarily affect the entire plant; in fact, usually only one or two fruits are affected. This also happens more often on older heirloom varieties. The good news is that it will quit happening when temps moderate and the resulting fruit is quite amusing as well as perfectly edible. Print This Article This article was last updated on 11/10/15 Did you find this helpful? Share it with your friends! 255 30 35 0 330 Additional Help & Information Didn't find the answer to your question? Ask one of our friendly gardening experts. Do you know anything about gardening? Help answer someone's gardening question. Read more articles about Tomatoes. Search for more information Use the search box below to find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: Related Articles "tomato mosaicTomato Mosaic Virus Symptoms: Managing Tomato Mosaic Virus "tomato zipperingZippers On Tomatoes – Information About Tomato Fruit Zippering "tomato-catfacingCatfacing Fruit Deformity: Learn About Catfacing On Tomatoes Newest Articles Spathiphyllum plant with flowers in flower pot, isolated on white background. Commonly known as Spath or peace lilies. Do Peace Lilies Need Fertilizer – When To Feed Peace Lily Plants Tree of Heaven Common Invasive Plants In Zones 9-11 And How To Avoid Them Yellow leaves of the Ginkgo tree Yellow Fall Colored Trees: Trees That Turn Yellow In Autumn Lombardy Poplar Latin name Populus nigra Italica deciduous trees without leaves Lombardy Poplar Facts – Guide To Lombardy Poplar Care In The Landscape Gardening. Woman with organic carrots in a vegetable garden. Happy girl harvesting carrots in field. Gardener with carrots in garden. Harvest. Young farmer harvesting carrots. Vegetables For Zone 3: What Are Vegetables That Grow In Cold Climates Learn More About… kumquat flower Kumquat Not Flowering: How To Get Blooms On A Kumquat Tree passionflower variety Passion Flower Types: What Are Some Common Passion Flower Varieties fresh harvested black radishes Black Radish Info: Learn How To Grow Black Radish Plants trumpet cutting Trumpet Plant Propagation – How To Root Trumpet Vine Cuttings On The Blog Gardener's Supply Company Splash Potted Amaryllis Giveaway History Of Tigerella Heirloom Tomatoes How To Grow Herbs Indoors Year Round

Read more at Gardening Know How: Tomato Fruit Problems – Reasons For Weird Shaped Tomatoes http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/weird-shaped-tomatoes.htm

Peek a Boo Purrl

 

 

photoblog image IMG_0191sat.JPG

 

I looked up information on the odd shaped tomato. Here is the simplest information. It will not let me copy and paste the words so the link will have to do.  The last item in the article is what you want to read. Their explanation is good for both the fact of our very hot summer and 100% of my tomatoes were heirloom.

 

Deformed Tomato Fruit Noses Have you ever seen a tomato with a “nose” on it? Such weird shaped tomatoes may have what looks like horns as well. What causes tomato noses? Well, it’s a physiological/genetic disorder that occurs in about 1 out of every 1,000 plants. Basically, the problem arises when the fruit is still microscopic. A few cells divide incorrectly and make an extra fruit locule. When you slice into a tomato, they have 4 or 6 obvious segments, which are called locules. As the tomato grows, the genetic mutation that occurred when it was microscopic grows with the fruit until eventually you see a mature tomato with a ‘nose’ or horns. The environment has to do with the genetic mutation. Extended temps of above 90 degrees F. (32 C.) and over 82-85 F. (27-29 C.) at night cause this deformity. It doesn’t necessarily affect the entire plant; in fact, usually only one or two fruits are affected. This also happens more often on older heirloom varieties. The good news is that it will quit happening when temps moderate and the resulting fruit is quite amusing as well as perfectly edible.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Tomato Fruit Problems – Reasons For Weird Shaped Tomatoes http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/weird-shaped-tomatoes.htm

 

 

Deformed Tomato Fruit Noses Have you ever seen a tomato with a “nose” on it? Such weird shaped tomatoes may have what looks like horns as well. What causes tomato noses? Well, it’s a physiological/genetic disorder that occurs in about 1 out of every 1,000 plants. Basically, the problem arises when the fruit is still microscopic. A few cells divide incorrectly and make an extra fruit locule. When you slice into a tomato, they have 4 or 6 obvious segments, which are called locules. As the tomato grows, the genetic mutation that occurred when it was microscopic grows with the fruit until eventually you see a mature tomato with a ‘nose’ or horns. The environment has to do with the genetic mutation. Extended temps of above 90 degrees F. (32 C.) and over 82-85 F. (27-29 C.) at night cause this deformity. It doesn’t necessarily affect the entire plant; in fact, usually only one or two fruits are affected. This also happens more often on older heirloom varieties. The good news is that it will quit happening when temps moderate and the resulting fruit is quite amusing as well as perfectly edible.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Tomato Fruit Problems – Reasons For Weird Shaped Tomatoes http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/weird-shaped-tomatoes.htm
Deformed Tomato Fruit Noses Have you ever seen a tomato with a “nose” on it? Such weird shaped tomatoes may have what looks like horns as well. What causes tomato noses? Well, it’s a physiological/genetic disorder that occurs in about 1 out of every 1,000 plants. Basically, the problem arises when the fruit is still microscopic. A few cells divide incorrectly and make an extra fruit locule. When you slice into a tomato, they have 4 or 6 obvious segments, which are called locules. As the tomato grows, the genetic mutation that occurred when it was microscopic grows with the fruit until eventually you see a mature tomato with a ‘nose’ or horns. The environment has to do with the genetic mutation. Extended temps of above 90 degrees F. (32 C.) and over 82-85 F. (27-29 C.) at night cause this deformity. It doesn’t necessarily affect the entire plant; in fact, usually only one or two fruits are affected. This also happens more often on older heirloom varieties. The good news is that it will quit happening when temps moderate and the resulting fruit is quite amusing as well as perfectly edible. Print This Article This article was last updated on 11/10/15 Did you find this helpful? Share it with your friends! 255 30 35 0 330 Additional Help & Information Didn't find the answer to your question? Ask one of our friendly gardening experts. Do you know anything about gardening? Help answer someone's gardening question. Read more articles about Tomatoes. Search for more information Use the search box below to find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: Related Articles "tomato mosaicTomato Mosaic Virus Symptoms: Managing Tomato Mosaic Virus "tomato zipperingZippers On Tomatoes – Information About Tomato Fruit Zippering "tomato-catfacingCatfacing Fruit Deformity: Learn About Catfacing On Tomatoes Newest Articles Spathiphyllum plant with flowers in flower pot, isolated on white background. Commonly known as Spath or peace lilies. Do Peace Lilies Need Fertilizer – When To Feed Peace Lily Plants Tree of Heaven Common Invasive Plants In Zones 9-11 And How To Avoid Them Yellow leaves of the Ginkgo tree Yellow Fall Colored Trees: Trees That Turn Yellow In Autumn Lombardy Poplar Latin name Populus nigra Italica deciduous trees without leaves Lombardy Poplar Facts – Guide To Lombardy Poplar Care In The Landscape Gardening. Woman with organic carrots in a vegetable garden. Happy girl harvesting carrots in field. Gardener with carrots in garden. Harvest. Young farmer harvesting carrots. Vegetables For Zone 3: What Are Vegetables That Grow In Cold Climates Learn More About… kumquat flower Kumquat Not Flowering: How To Get Blooms On A Kumquat Tree passionflower variety Passion Flower Types: What Are Some Common Passion Flower Varieties fresh harvested black radishes Black Radish Info: Learn How To Grow Black Radish Plants trumpet cutting Trumpet Plant Propagation – How To Root Trumpet Vine Cuttings On The Blog Gardener's Supply Company Splash Potted Amaryllis Giveaway History Of Tigerella Heirloom Tomatoes How To Grow Herbs Indoors Year Round

Read more at Gardening Know How: Tomato Fruit Problems – Reasons For Weird Shaped Tomatoes http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/weird-shaped-tomatoes.htm

comments (10)

Ha, ha, great pic's, Mary.
Mary MacADNski: They love rituals.
  • Ray
  • Thailand
  • 19 Nov 2016, 03:55
Love it, Mary!

Cats are wonderful players in piles of leaves and straw!
Mary MacADNski: They love this. Cutting down the asparagus is their favorite but leaves will do.
LOVE these photos!!!
And the link was most interesting!! Huh!!
Mary MacADNski: Thanks on both. The weather has cooled here too in the last 24 hours so kitties and I are happy inside today.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 19 Nov 2016, 07:41
Splendid cat images and thanks for the tomato info
Mary MacADNski: Thank you muchly and I have always seen that in tomatoes but less than this year.
  • elleplate
  • United Kingdom
  • 19 Nov 2016, 11:45
Cats love to hide!
Mary MacADNski: They have rituals with the various garden chores. Asparagus is their fave.
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 19 Nov 2016, 11:58
Oh, she might love to play in the midth of the rushing leaves.
Mary MacADNski: Oh they do. As long as you play with them they will act like kittens.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 19 Nov 2016, 14:03
Hahah!!! I can see her! Her bushy tail is not helping her hide in the leaves. I bet she enjoys the game.
Mary MacADNski: They love playing outdoors in the various garden seasons. They have lots of behaviors that they remember from other years.
Purrl is clearly having a great time.

Thank you for the tomato link
Mary MacADNski: It was her turn this week again. The link is good eh?
She does enjoy herself! Interesting link!
Mary MacADNski: They have a ball in the great outdoors. It was cold today though so only Ruby and I ventured out, a couple of times each.
  • Martine
  • France
  • 20 Nov 2016, 06:18
J'adore le chat dans les feuilles.
Mary MacADNski: They love to hide and jump.

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