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04 Jul 2017 123 views
 
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photoblog image Argiope aurantia -Yellow Garden Spider

Argiope aurantia -Yellow Garden Spider

In 24 hours the last week of June, I found four yellow and black spider's nests exploding. I did not capture the first one. These nests are from the common Yellow Garden Spider which I have shown many times in the past. I like Wiki's description of

reproduction:

 

Yellow garden spiders breed twice a year. The males roam in search of a female, building a small web near or actually in the female's web, then court the females by plucking strands on her web. Often, when the male approaches the female, he has a safety drop line ready, in case she attacks him. The male uses the palpal bulbs on his pedipalps to transfer sperm to the female.[11] After inserting the second palpal bulb, the male dies, and is sometimes then eaten by the female.[11]

 
Egg sac

She lays her eggs at night on a sheet of silky material, then covers them with another layer of silk, then a protective brownish silk. She then uses her legs to form the sheet into a ball with an upturned neck. Egg sacs range from 5/8" to 1" in diameter. She often suspends the egg sac right on her web, near the center where she spends most of her time. Each spider produces from one to four sacs with perhaps over a thousand eggs inside each. She guards the eggs against predation as long as she is able. However, as the weather cools, she becomes more frail, and dies around the time of the first hard frost.

 
Argiope aurantia spiderlings

In the spring, the young spiders exit the sac. They are so tiny that they look like dust gathered inside the silk mesh. Some of the spiderlings remain nearby, but others exude a strand of silk that gets caught by the breeze, carrying the spiderling to a more distant area.

 

Hmm... I had no idea the photos were coming with my copied text.

Argiope aurantia -Yellow Garden Spider

In 24 hours the last week of June, I found four yellow and black spider's nests exploding. I did not capture the first one. These nests are from the common Yellow Garden Spider which I have shown many times in the past. I like Wiki's description of

reproduction:

 

Yellow garden spiders breed twice a year. The males roam in search of a female, building a small web near or actually in the female's web, then court the females by plucking strands on her web. Often, when the male approaches the female, he has a safety drop line ready, in case she attacks him. The male uses the palpal bulbs on his pedipalps to transfer sperm to the female.[11] After inserting the second palpal bulb, the male dies, and is sometimes then eaten by the female.[11]

 
Egg sac

She lays her eggs at night on a sheet of silky material, then covers them with another layer of silk, then a protective brownish silk. She then uses her legs to form the sheet into a ball with an upturned neck. Egg sacs range from 5/8" to 1" in diameter. She often suspends the egg sac right on her web, near the center where she spends most of her time. Each spider produces from one to four sacs with perhaps over a thousand eggs inside each. She guards the eggs against predation as long as she is able. However, as the weather cools, she becomes more frail, and dies around the time of the first hard frost.

 
Argiope aurantia spiderlings

In the spring, the young spiders exit the sac. They are so tiny that they look like dust gathered inside the silk mesh. Some of the spiderlings remain nearby, but others exude a strand of silk that gets caught by the breeze, carrying the spiderling to a more distant area.

 

Hmm... I had no idea the photos were coming with my copied text.

comments (10)

I noticed looking back that one of the spiders is different, with the black markings on the back different than the other two.
  • Ray
  • Not in United States
  • 4 Jul 2017, 00:50
Thank you, Mary...informative and lovely eye candy as well!
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 4 Jul 2017, 06:37
Fascinating stuff Mary
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 4 Jul 2017, 08:10
Pretty frightening really Mary. Someone told me that the weight of all spiders in the world is greater than the weight of all humans.
Ain't nature wonderful!
  • Anne
  • United Kingdom
  • 4 Jul 2017, 15:38
Looking like little beads of gold as they hatch.
Busy little things...
  • Lisl
  • Bath, England
  • 4 Jul 2017, 17:46
All very interesting, thank you, Mary
  • Alan
  • United Kingdom
  • 4 Jul 2017, 19:08
Crikey, there's hundreds of them. I suppose few make it through to adulthood maybe due to predation? They certainly make a colourful display.
I so love this!! I have some similar photo's of a different spider!

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